Sportster Rebuild Project – Motorcycle Frame Rusty Clean Up



Spent some time with the Sporty Frame getting it all cleaned up. Rusty Rusty!

Amazon Store (has all the links for everything)
https://www.amazon.com/shop/housework

–Tools & Supplies–
Starter Rebuild Kit – https://amzn.to/2YTvPht
Starter Push Button – https://amzn.to/2FQUHxY
Craftsman Ratchet Set – https://amzn.to/2WPuRRO
Drill – https://amzn.to/2FhrTj9
Ryobi Angle Grinder – https://amzn.to/2uuPE0O
Tire Kit with Valve Stem Removal Tool – https://amzn.to/2YpK0e3
Wire Wheel – https://amzn.to/2UeKSTB
Self Tapping Screws – https://amzn.to/2Fhuh9w
Ryobi Hot Glue Gun – https://amzn.to/2UFPE9J
Hot Glue – https://amzn.to/2ObZXjb
Bearing Puller – https://amzn.to/2JSUb7L
Estwing Hammer – https://amzn.to/2TGhVvr

–Video–
Canon M50 – https://amzn.to/2Y2fHKo
Canon 70D – https://amzn.to/2Y3ZiVN
GoPro Hero 7 Black – https://amzn.to/2TI5fsU
GoPro Battery Chargers – https://amzn.to/2TFwXqh
M50 Charger – https://amzn.to/2UCbevz
70D Charger – https://amzn.to/2Cn5izK
Light Kit – https://amzn.to/2F7vGyb
Tripod – https://amzn.to/2Y2fUNG

–Sound–
Lavalier Microphone – https://amzn.to/2WLHKw3
Microphone – https://amzn.to/2Y5tGyP
Sound Dampener – https://amzn.to/2UNmKUY
Clamp Mount – https://amzn.to/2UAxJBc
XLR Cable – https://amzn.to/2Cokfl0
Microphone Tripod Boom – https://amzn.to/2F31pAg
Headphones – https://amzn.to/2W4NGQv

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Sick Day + Whole Foods + Clean With Me | Vlog by Dom



Hey y’all, welcome back to my channel.
Asa had a little bug recently, so I kept him home from school and we spent the day together. I did a little shopping, cooking and a little cleaning. Hope y’all are having a great weekend!
I’ll be working on editing my parody video, and will hopefully have it up tomorrow. 🙂

XO Dom

Music by Julian Avila: https://soundcloud.com/julian_avila

Social:
http://instagram.com/msdomanderson
http://facebook.com/littlemissdom

GEAR I USE:
Vlogging camera, Canon PowerShot G7: http://amzn.to/2jHhf9a
Canon T5i: http://amzn.to/1PsGwP
MacBook Air: http://amzn.to/1PPkh86
Sigma Lens: http://amzn.to/1Kl2Yt4
Tripod (lightweight and easy to set-up) http://amzn.to/1P8xpzJ
Lighting Kit: http://amzn.to/1m7Uuu6
Timelapse accessory: http://amzn.to/1Kl3qb0
Battery Chargers: http://amzn.to/1P8yEyC
Hard Drive 1TB: http://amzn.to/1PsIS0l
Memory Cards: http://amzn.to/1m7UFW9, http://amzn.to/1P8zcoc
Lens Cap Keepers: http://amzn.to/1Kl4M5w

*Affiliate links above.

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3 Steps to Clean Your Leather Motorcycle Jacket

Regularly cleaning a leather motorcycle jacket is an essential process to keep it looking its best. Leather suites, boots, trousers and jackets can cost literally thousands, so it is worth a little extra time and effort to help maintain the beautiful finish. A high-quality leather jacket can easily start to dry out and crack if the proper care isn’t provided. The actual process of cleaning and conditioning the motorcycle gear is quite easy. Plus, the jackets that are well-maintained are more supple which means they are more comfortable to wear and easier to put on and take off. An ideal time-frame to clean the leather motorcycle jacket is every 3 or 4 months.

What is involved in the cleaning process?

Initial cleaning

Before starting the cleaning process, you want to find a convenient place to hang your leathers. Use a coat hanger and make sure there is enough space to work. Start the cleaning process with a bowl of hot soapy water. Stay away from harsh detergents or washing up liquid, and instead use a mild soap similar to a shower gel. Give the jacket a good wipe down using a microfiber cloth or similar to make sure it is completely clean.

Leave to dry

Once the jacket is fully clean and all signs of dirt have been removed, leave it in an open area to air dry. Don’t use a tumble dryer, hair dryer or other heated appliance to speed things up. Heating leather based clothes can increase the risk of the material shrinking, splitting or cracking.

When the jacket is dry, you are ready to start on the conditioning step. It is always important to complete the initial cleaning to remove the dirt. If you go directly to conditioning, there is the risk of trapping the dirt which can lead to a quite atrocious look.

Apply conditioner

Apply a high quality leather conditioner that easily absorbs into the leather to make sure it does its job well and gives long-term protection. Massage the preferred conditioner all over the jacket using your hands or a dry cloth. Give the seams and stitching special attention because these areas are more at risk of cracking or rotting in the future. After a good coating is applied, leave the jacket overnight to dry. At first the leather material may feel a little greasy, but once the conditioner is fully absorbed, it should look wonderful.

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How to Clean a Motorcycle Carburetor, The Right Way

I get asked about Carburetor Cleaning regularly both from readers and from friends offline. So I’ve decided to write a definitive guide for cleaning carbs the RIGHT way. So put your tools down for a minute, grab a beer, and give this a read. You might just save yourself a lot of headache and sweat.

Carbs come in many shapes and sizes. Single carbs, dual carbs, racks of 3, 4 or 6, V racks, carbs with ticklers, carbs with accelerators, carbs with asynchronous designs, and carbs that operate vertically. While working on some carburetors is more difficult (due to design) than others, they all share the same basic components, and the process of cleaning those components is generally identical.

BEFORE YOU START

Make sure that dirty carbs are actually your problem. Lots of things can make a bike run poorly or not start. Weak battery, corroded electrics, old spark plugs, bad timing, low compression, mis-adjusted valves, dirty air filter, and plugged exhausts can all cause poor running. I’ll write an article eventually on how to diagnose poor running conditions shortly, but for now – lets just deal with the carbs.

OK, SO YOUR CARBS ARE DIRTY

Once it has been determined that the carbs are the problem it’s time to get to it. Some racks of carbs are easier to remove than others. If you’re working on a newer model bike the rubber boots from the airbox to the carbs and the manifold boots from the carbs to the motor should be relatively soft and pliable. On older bikes however this is rarely the case.

First remove the fuel tank, seat, and side covers. Depending on your model of bike other parts may need to be removed too. For many single cylinder bikes the carb can often be removed without removing any body work at all.

The bike below is a 1983 Yamaha XJ750 Seca with 4 inline Hitachi carburetors

You’ll want to loosen the circle clamps on all of the rubber boots. Sometimes I’ll even take them all right off (carefully, without bending them too badly) so that they aren’t in the way.

Inspect the airbox. On many bikes it is bolted in place to tabs on the frame. Remove those bolts and try to create as much space as possible for the airbox to pull backwards.

Next, put the bike on it’s centerstand and straddle it facing forward. Put your right hand on the right-most carburetor and your left hand on the left-most carburetor and get ready to sweat. Sometimes you’ll be able to pull the carbs straight backwards nice and easy, but that is pretty rare. I usually end up rotating them up then rotating them down as best I can while pulling backwards furiously. This can really take some work and time, especially if you’ve never done it before. In real extreme cases where you simple can’t get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots I have a couple tips. These tips should only be used in extremely difficult cases when you have been struggling for an hour and simple can’t get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots.

Tip 1: Ratchet Straps – This is sort of a last resort, but it has worked without fail for me when I’m pooling sweat on the garage floor and the carbs aren’t budging. Wrap a ratchet strap around one of the outer carbs and put the hooks somewhere on the rear of the frame. Then slowly ratchet the carbs right out of the boots. Be careful not to pull them too cockeye’d or you could damage the boots. Attach a second ratchet strap to the other side if necessary. (Note: you can do this in the opposite direction to force carbs back into the boots once they are clean.)

Tip 2: Full Pull! – You should do this before you do the ratchet strap method above. Sit down on your butt along one side of the bike. Wedge one of your feet up between the forks and the front fender, then put both hands on the same outermost carb and PULL PULL PULL! This might not work so well if you’re short! Ha.

Ok, So The Carbs are pulled back

Chances are the airbox boots are all crammed up now. Do your best to rotate the carbs up and out from the boots and pull them out one side of the bike. Sometimes it’s easier to pull the carbs out one side than the other, so have a look to see if there are frame elements, motor elements, or hoses that may block the carbs from coming out on one side.

Also keep note of the throttle cable(s) and choke cable (if there is one). Now may be a good time to loosen the nuts that hold them in place and disconnect them.

Struggle just a couple more minutes wriggling the carbs out the side.

Ok, You have the carbs off the bike

Make sure you brush off any loose dirt or grime, then flip the carbs over and remove the screws from the corners of the carburetor. Some carbs won’t have bolts in the corner and instead have a wire latch over top which can just be forced over.

Remove the bowls.

If the carbs are real gummed up the insides might look like this:

It’s obvious that these carbs are all clogged up. Some carbs might not look so bad, some might be a lot worse. It’s always a mystery what will be inside the bowls.

Now it’s time to remove the floats. It’s generally a good idea to drench everything in carb cleaner (available at any autoparts store). Sometimes the pins will practically fall right out, sometimes they’ll be so stubborn you won’t think they’ll ever come free. But they will! Carefully push on the pin from either side. Sometimes a nail and a gentle tap from a hammer is helpful. **BE CAREFUL**, using force to remove a stuck float pin can break off the pin tower. If they are really stuck and you can’t seem to work them free here are a couple tips.

Tip 1: Heat – Adding a little flame to the float pin towers can help. **Don’t Burn Down Your Garage!!**

Tip 2: Pliers – Using pliers to gently clamp the end of the pin and push it through has worked well for me in the past. **Don’t break the towers!!**

Once the float pin is out you can remove the floats, the float needle, and unscrew the float jet screen.

Set everything aside. Next remove the main jet, pilot jet, and idle jet (if there is one). They should come out easily with a flathead screw driver.

Set them aside.

Next flip the carburetors back over and remove the caps. Underneath the caps is a rubber diaphram with a spring. Sometimes the caps have a tendency to shoot off the top, so be very methodical when removing the screws. Other times the cap tends to stick down until you start to pry at it, then it shoots off, again, just be cautious and don’t loose any parts.

Next you’ll want to gently pull the slides up out of the carburetor body. You can gently pull on the rubber diaphrams, but be very careful not to tear them. If they don’t come up easily stick your finger into the carb intake and push the slide up with your finger. You can also gently pry it with a screw driver (gently). If it doesn’t want to budge don’t force it. Instead finish reading this article and pay attention to the boiling tips further down.

Now your carbs should be pretty well emptied out. If the throttle on the bike moved fluidly and smooth there is little reason to do much to the carb bodies themselves. However, if the trottle was real sticky or frozen there are a few things you can do to free it up. Sometimes just drenching all the throttle components on the carbs and letting it soak is enough, other times it is not. I generally try to break racks of carbs apart. It isn’t often necessary and can be confusing to put everything back together in the right places. Also, the little rubber connector hoses and o-rings have a tendency to crack or leak if you mess with them. If you can’t work the throttle back and forth until its smooth have a look at the boiling tips further down.

Keep it Neat

Organization pays off.

Clean the Main, Idle and Pilot Jets

Hold each jet up to the light and see if you can look through it. The idle and/or pilot jets have extremely small holes so make sure you are looking through them straight. If you can see through the jet it isn’t clogged. There could be a little gunk built up around the edges so spray them down with carb cleaner and let them sit a bit.

If you can’t see through the jet it is clogged and needs to be cleaned. Always try the easiest things first. Here’s an ordered list of a few things you can do to clean the jet.

Blow through it. – Rarely works, but hey, who knows.

Compressed air. – Force 100 pounds into it. Works occasionally. Make sure to hold the jet tightly so it doesn’t go flying across the garage. You might put the jet back into the carb body to hold it in place for this.

Soak it in cleaner. – When I first started cleaning carbs I thought carb cleaner would be the magic answer. It isn’t. In fact, I hardly ever use carb cleaner any more, because it simply doesn’t do a very good job of anything but removing varnish from the bowl and slide. But try this.

Poking it through. – Collect a few different diameters of needle like objects. A wire from a steel bristle brush works well, a bristle from a broom works well, a baby pin, small sewing needle, etc. Very gently try to poke it through the jet. If you are using a metal needle use caution, brass jets can scratch and deform easily.

Boiling! – This works better than anything. Toss the jets into a pot of boiling water and let them bounce around for a couple minutes. When you pull them out blow some compressed air through them and you’ll most likely be good to go.

Some idle jets can be real tricky and never seem like they’ll be cleaned out . . . Just keep working at it, I’ve never met a jet that couldn’t be cleaned.

Cleaning the Choke and Air Mixture Screw

Air mixture screws have a tendency to strip or break. If the carbs were real gummed up you might find that the air screws are stuck. Don’t force them, if they don’t want to come out, just leave them for now. It is fairly rare that these screws will need to be cleaned because they are above the float level. If you can get them out just wipe them down with carb cleaner and spray some through the jet.

Cleaning the Slide and Needle

These are easy to clean. Squirt them with a bit of carb cleaner, wd-40, or anything similar, then wipe them down with a rag. Once the varnish is gone they’re good to go. Sometimes they get heavy varnish on them which I will scratch off carefully with a piece of plastic. Scratching the slide and needle is a BAD thing, use caution.

Cleaning the Carb Bodies

Use the same squirt and wipe method noted above. Most of the time the other pressed jets and passages in the carburetors won’t be clogged. But if the bike has been sitting a real long time with squirrels in the airbox it is certainly possible. Us a compressor to blow some air into every passage you can see. Listen for the air coming out the other side. If no air compressor is available use a can of WD-40 with a straw attachment.

If some of the pressed jets are clogged it can be difficult to open them up. There are a few things you can do.

Carb Dip – Most autoparts stores sell carb dip. It comes in a can similar to a paint can and is a VERY harsh cleaning agent. Soak the entire carbs in this dip. This dip can eat at rubber and plastics if they are submerged for too long, so try and remove everything you can from the carb bodies before soaking them. Once you pull them out swish the carbs around in a bucket of water to clean off the excess dip, then hose them down with WD-40 to get rid of the water.

Boiling in Water – Not many people do this but it is by far the best way of cleaning carburetors. Dropping the carbs into a pot of boiling water will instantly free up stuck slides, throttle plates, and other frozen parts. It will also loosen the dirt and grime clogging up pressed jets and other passages. Just make sure to dry the carbs thoroughly with compressed air or the sun afterwards.

Boiling in Lemon Juice – There is NOTHING BETTER at cleaning carbs than a giant pot of boiling lemon juice. The acidity from the lemons eats through everything; gas varnish, oil build up, dirt, grime, etc. Sometimes I won’t even bother doing anything but this – I’ll just remove the bowls, remove the caps, then drop everything into the pot and let it sit for 20 minutes (rotate them a few times). The one caveat to doing this is that you’ll want to wash the lemon juice off the carbs as soon as you pull them out. So have a bucket of water ready, or a can of WD-40 to hose them down. Also note that the acidity has a tendency to put a dull finish on the aluminum bodies of the carbs. This isn’t a problem in most cases, but if you must have everything shiny be prepared to do a little scrubbing and polishing afterwards. It may sound weird, but trust me, I just saved you LOTS of time. (Most dollar stores sell 1/2 gallon jugs of lemon juice, so buying a few gallons will only cost you $6. Plus you can put it back into the bottles afterwards and save it for next time.)

Cleaning the Bowls

This is pretty straight forward. Use any of the methods above to transform your varnished bowls.

Most carb bowls are simple, just clean them up and they are good to go. But I picked this Hitachi’s for photos because they have a jet built into the bowl. You can see the ‘fifth’ hole along the edge of the bowl, that is actually a thin passage that extends to the bottom of the bowl. This is for the idle jet and is extremely important. If these passages are clogged, the bike won’t stay running, period. Use the same poke, soak, and boiling methods outlined elsewhere in this article. Not all bowls have these passages, only some, if your’s don’t – good for you!

Once Everything is Clean

Now that everything is clean it’s time to put it all back together. Take your time and make sure you put everything back where it came from. WD-40 is your friend. When screwing in the jets don’t over do it, they only need to be seated and snug, do NOT use any force putting the carbs back together.

If the bowl gaskets got goobered up you can put a little RVT on them. So long as the float needles are still in good condition leaky gaskets shouldn’t be an issue. However, prudent carb tinkerers may want to order replacements if necessary.

Once the carbs are back together stuff them back into the bike!

Extra Notes

Rebuild Kits – This guide did not mention rebuild kits until now. Rebuild kits (consisting of new gaskets, jets, needles, etc) can be purchased for nearly any bike, both old and new. 95% of the time these are NOT needed. I have rebuilt enough carbs to block off main street, and only once have I used new parts. ONCE!

Carburetor Adjustment – Carburetor adjustment, setup, jetting, and synchronizing is a whole encyclopedia waiting to happen. Those topics are not covered in this article, but I will address them in future articles.

Carburetor Polishing – External carb asthetics will be important to some, and not to others. Cleaning is all I am covering here, this will be addressed in the future.

Work Space – Make sure you have lots of space to keep organized. I also like to work on a wooden surface because it absorbs the spilled gas and cleaners rather than pooling.

That’s it! You’re Done!

I’ll continue to write a couple more related articles about diagnosing carburetion issues as well as the proper way to adjust, jet, and tune your carbs.

admin

Clean and Test Your Smoke Detectors

We all know that we should be changing our smoke detector batteries every year but you may not know that you should clean your smoke detectors every 6 months. Dust, dirt and pollens can collect on the outside screen and prevent the detector from working properly.

There are two basic types of detectors: photoelectric and ionization.

Photoelectric smoke detectors are designed for detecting smoke where there is smoke but not necessarily flames. Photoelectric detectors are the most widely used type of detector. A photoelectric type smoke alarm consists of a light emitting diode and a light sensitive sensor in the sensing chamber. An ionization type smoke alarm uses a small amount of radioactive material to ionize air in the sensing chamber. Ionization type detectors work best for rapidly firing fires in combustible materials, where there are lots of flames but little smoke. Ionization type detectors are often used in kitchens, since they are less likely to be falsely triggered by cooking fumes.

How do you clean a smoke detector?

If your answer is just grab a can of compressed air and blow it out then I am sorry but WRONG!

Over time your detector will accumulate dust dirt and other particles on the screen located on the outside of your detector. This is the same screen that must allow smoke to enter the chamber so the detector can "detect". If you use compressed air to blow it out then you are actually blowing a fair amount of the particles deeper into the chamber which will only make the detector worse.

You can use the brush attachment on your vacuum cleaner to gently brush the smoke detector and with the vacuum on it will remove the particles away from the chamber. You should also remove the outside cover so you can gain access to the inside chamber and vacuum it also. After you have vacuumed away all of the dirt you should wipe down the outside of the unit with a damp cloth to remove any stubborn dirt build up.

CAUTION: Clean your smoke alarm after it has been removed from the security system and make sure the system is in "TEST" when you perform this maintenance. You can cause a false alarm during this process.

Test Your Smoke Detector

After you have completed the cleaning process you should reinstall the smoke detector back into the base. Since the system is in test it is a great time to test the smoke detector. If your smoke detector is an integrated part of your alarm system then you do not need to arm the system. This is a 24 hour device and should work all of the time. Most smoke detectors have a button, recessed or protruding that you can push to test. This makes sure that the unit is detected by the alarm panel. It does not test the ability of the detector to accept smoke and put the system into alarm. I am not suggesting that you set something on fire to test your alarm. There are aerosol spray cans that are specifically designed for testing detectors.

You can do your own cleaning and testing of your detectors or your local alarm company will typically have a "Spring Cleaning" special that will include testing your entire system and also cleaning both smoke and motion detectors.

admin

Braun 7526 Shaver – Syncro System With Clean & Charge Storage Stand Review

One of the main reasons I have tried to stay away from electric razors for my entire adult life was because of how dirty they get. Little bits of beard stubble will build up at the bottom of the razor, and it would need to be cleaned off with a damp rag and aq tip. No matter how long I would work on cleaning the shaver, I could never get it completely clean. I felt the extra work made up of the convenience of having an electric shaver, and that that, the disposable razor just appeared to shave closer.

The Braun 7526 Shaver has changed all of that. When I first heard that the Braun 7526 shaver could clean itself, I was skeptical. I thought self cleaning mean that it came with some kind of tool that you would use to manually brush out the unwanted hair. I could not have been more wrong. After using the Braun 7526 Shaver, you just place it back in the Syncro System with Clean & Charge Storage Stand, press a button, and it will start to clean itself automatically. The stand also recharges the razor.

There is an alcohol based solution in the stand, and this is used to give the razor a thorough cleaning. The Beard stubble is caught in a filter that will need to be changed every 4 – 6 weeks. These filters are available in 2 packs and 3 packs, and they can be purchased at the same place you purchase your Braun 7526 Shaver.

The Braun 7526 Shaver will shave as close as any blade, and it will not cut your face like a disposable razor will. It comes with a separate cord that you can take with you on overnight trips, although you will need the stand for the self cleaning feature.

If I had to complain about anything, it would be the noise the stand makes while it is cleaning the razor. I usually just press the button before I leave in the morning and then I do not hear the noise.

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The Solar Battery Charger – Free, Clean, And Renewable Energy

One of the most annoying realities of our electronic lifestyle is that so many of our electronic must-haves are battery operated. And depending on how often we use them, the life of their batteries can be from a single day to a couple of weeks. While a package of disposable batteries, depending on their size, usually costs less than $ 5, if they are powering an addiction forming device lie a GameBoy, you may burn through them the way a chain smoker burns through a pack of cigarettes.

While TV remotes, flashlights, and smoke detector batteries may only need changing once or twice a year, GameBoys, MP3s, and cell phones are different stories. Not only that; some of the most-used battery-powered devices require not one, but two batteries. The simple truth is, even disposable batteries can make a dent in the entertainment budget.

Environmental Issues

Not only that; actually disposing of disposable batteries has become an issue, and many landfills are no longer taking them because of the danger they pose to groundwater. Fortunately, many battery manufacturers have been ahead of the environmental curve in addressing this issue, and are now marketing rechargeable batteries to replace disposable ones. And they have gone one environmental step further by creating the solar battery charger.

Advantages Of Solar Battery Chargers

A solar battery charger has two advantages; Unlike wall chargers, it does not use energy which you have to pay for to recharge your batteries, and unlike wall chargers, it does not require an electrical outlet. A solar battery charger has built in solar panels which, when placed in a sunny locations, gather the sun's rays, which the charger connects to free electricity and feeds to your rechargeable battery or batteries.

As long as you have sun, you'll have a way to keep you electronic devices up and running; and a solar battery charger can get your batteries fully recharged in as little as three hours on the brightest days. Most rechargeable batteries are equipped with a light to let you know when they have reached their full charge.

A solar battery charger is not large; in fact it is easily transportable so that you can move it to whatever location will provide the best sun exposure. With a solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries, you need never worry about running out of power for your electronic device again. And even better, you will be powering them with free, renewable, clean solar energy, stored in rechargeable batteries which require no environmentally-threatening disposal!

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Clean With Me | Working Mom Cleaning | Whole House Cleaning



Hey y’all, happy Friday!
Hope you all had a wonderful week.
Today I have a cleaning video for you! I got a lot of work done, and cleaned pretty much the whole house. The only space I don’t usually clean that frequently is our upstairs loft, because it’s currently under construction. 🙂
Let me know if you have any questions at all.
Also, leave a comment below and tell me what kinds of videos you’d like to see next!

-Dom

Music by Joakim Karud http://youtube.com/joakimkarud

Social:
http://instagram.com/msdomanderson
http://facebook.com/littlemissdom

GEAR I USE:
Vlogging camera, Canon PowerShot G7: http://amzn.to/2jHhf9a
Canon T5i: http://amzn.to/1PsGwP
MacBook Air: http://amzn.to/1PPkh86
iPhone 6: http://amzn.to/1Kl3tU1
Sigma Lens: http://amzn.to/1Kl2Yt4
Tripod (lightweight and easy to set-up) http://amzn.to/1P8xpzJ
Lighting Kit: http://amzn.to/1m7Uuu6
Timelapse accessory: http://amzn.to/1Kl3qb0
Battery Chargers: http://amzn.to/1P8yEyC
Hard Drive 1TB: http://amzn.to/1PsIS0l
Memory Cards: http://amzn.to/1m7UFW9, http://amzn.to/1P8zcoc
Lens Cap Keepers: http://amzn.to/1Kl4M5w

*Affiliate links above.

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Parts avatar will help you how to Clean the Battery Terminals



Follow these Steps:
– Cleaning the Battery Terminals
– Locate the Battery
– Lift the Terminal Covers
– Disconnect the Car Battery
– Choose Your Cleaning Agent
– Clean and Rinse
– Reconnect the Clamps

For more info about Cleaning the Battery Terminals, Click here : https://partsavatar.ca/2017-07-22-clean-car-battery-terminals-to-remove-battery-corrosion-use-safety-gloves-brush-protective-eyewear

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Soil Suspension – The Key to Clean Carpets

Anyone who has spent time cleaning carpets knows the approach to getting a carpet/rug clean you must follow 5 basic actions:

* Dry soil removal

* Soil suspension

* Soil extraction

* Pile setting (finishing or grooming)

* Drying

For the sake of this conversation I’ll step to the second bullet because I truly believe this is where OPers have a distinct advantage over other methods. With regards to soil suspension what we can do is employ:

* chemical action

* heat

* agitation

* time to maximize removal. And as you’ll see some steps carry more weight than others.

Chemical Action

Our first step in soil suspension is to use products that reduce the surface tension and dissolve the various soils (chemical action). What’s different about OPers is that when we use encapsulation we are emulsifying some dirt but in general we are growing macroscopic/bulk particles for removal by vacuuming. I maintain this is one cool approach that works quite well. However, when we using colloidal chemistry products (like Orbit Natural and Abstraction) we are using a “technology” that most other’s cleaners overlook.

The dirt and grime in carpets are layers of fine films made up of fat, oil, grease, bacteria, dust mites and skin etc. These films are bonded to each other and to the carpet fiber surface by amino and fatty acids. Most cleaners emulsify some of these films, but do not break down the amino and fatty acids which attract more soil to the carpet. Colloidal chemistry cleaning products use plant based ingredients to remove these films and acids.

The nano sized particles called micelles that represent the active ingredient in the products effectively cut through the carbon bonds in organic molecules and emulsify organic matter. Oil, grease and urine are broken down, suspended and safely lifted away from the carpet fibers. The quick degradation of organic waste causes a significant reduction of offensive odor caused by the naturally slow process of decay, and reduced organic residue will cause a diminution in population of disease carrying insects. Our OP process returns bounce to carpet fiber and effectively removes organic soil without damaging textile fibers.

Elevated Temperature (Heat)

Heat reduces the surface tension of water and enables faster, more efficient cleaning than cold water. It is merely a matter of thermodynamics: heat accelerates the molecular activity of chemicals employed, and thus aids in separation of unwanted matter from fibers. The issue here is that our first step whether encapsulation or colloidal chemistry does a great job of either isolating the dirt as a bulk particle or emulsifying the dirt thoroughly and thus eliminating the need to bring in heat via copious amount of hot water.

Agitation

Agitation is required to accomplish uniform chemical penetration and distribution throughout the carpet. In the absence of agitation, soil suspension tends to be non-uniform, which is often indicated by soil streaks following the removal process. Again what’s great for OPers is that our equipment delivers an aggressive agitation other carpet cleaners can’t provide. The best a “steam cleaner” can do is comb in the pre-conditioning chemicals. The other option would be to employ a bonnet / OP machine before HWE but this approach would be too labor and time prohibited as well as cost ineffective.

Time

Regardless of cleaning technique we all have time but it is often the least considered in obtaining soil suspension. Those soils in the carpet did not appear overnight, they were deposited and compacted over time so we must give the products time to perform their chemical action. Let “dwell time” be your friend and get adequate fiber penetration and maximum soil suspension will occur. If in doubt follow chemical manufacturer’s instructions.

Mike

Centex Green

mike@centexgreen.com

http://twitter.com/centexgreen

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