NRMA Electric Car Charging Network (Oct 2018 Update)



The NRMA is rolling out 40 electric car charging locations across NSW and ACT as part of its Social Dividend Reinvestment Strategy. The plan is set to cost the NRMA $10 million dollars and will account for 95% of road trips taken by NSW and ACT motorists. Each charger will be spaced at most 150km apart on major roadways. The latest location to go online is Mittagong, located at the Mittagong RSL Club carpark. All NRMA chargers are supplied by Australian company Tritium Veefil who have also supplied charging networks across Europe, USA and locally in Australia. Tritium chargers are rapid DC chargers using either ChaDeMo or CCS2.

More details:
NRMA installs charger in Southern Highlands: https://www.mynrma.com.au/community/news-and-media-centre/nrma-installs-first-ev-fast-charging-station-in-southern-highlands?fbclid=IwAR0mKZ_RPFGSlsxU4S6v7Kz9eBOL48ZsmFt5hh148vdgryd_BqLRRzEUX9s

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Cut Your Energy Bills in Half by Building an Energy Efficient Home!

Energy! This 6 letter word has easily become one of the most popular words in the world as oil prices, gas prices and energy prices have sky-rocketed! As I write this, oil is over $ 140 a barrel, gas prices where I live are hovering at $ 4.00 a gallon and electricity rates are rough $ 19. kwh. Now more than ever people are looking for ways to cut or slash their energy costs!

Back in late 2004 when I was designing (14) semi custom patio homes, I felt very strongly about energy efficiency and I knew that one day real soon, everyone would be concerned about energy efficiency! During this time, way before it was popular, I was building my homes with radiant barriers, energy efficient cooling systems and managed water systems. At that time these technologies were viewed as expensive alternatives to the standard construction procedures and products generally offered by builders, but the sentiment has now changed. These once overlooked technologies are quickly becoming the standard.

With this increased attention on energy efficiency, the real question is how can you build an energy efficient home without busting your budget! Most builders and contractors are charging premiums for outfitting homes with energy efficient products and it seems that overnight a whole new cottage industry has been created offering a host of high dollar energy saving solutions! Despite the glossy brochures, impressive sales presentations and overly accommodating sales representatives I think some of these products are overkill and their claims of costs savings in many cases are exaggerated at best!

So what is an Owner Builder to do? For starters, the first step in properly planning the construction of an energy efficient home is to consider what your overall budget is for the home you are building and within that budget how much (as a percentage) are you willing to invest in reducing your energy costs. In many cases, this figure could be as high as 10% however the average is anywhere from 5-8.5% of the overall cost of the home.

The first thing you want to consider is the climate for the area you are building in and the building envelope materials. Most homes through the United States consist of brick, Hardi-plank © siding and / or concrete. Concrete is green and energy efficient however it can be costly and there are several additional factors to consider such as lead times, renting pump trucks and higher labor costs. With that said, in places like Florida due to hurricanes concrete homes are the standard in many cases so there are exceptions. Brick on the other hand is a low maintenance product that offers several energy saving benefits when installed properly. Ideally you want an exterior product that will insulate your home from the forces of nature and contribute to your overall plan of lower energy costs.

The next step in building an energy efficient home is outfitting your home with the proper sized heating & cooling system AND choosing a qualified reputable contractor to install it. To ensure you have the rightized system, I suggest you invest in a Manual J analysis on your home plans. This analysis will give detailed suggestions on the type and size of heating & cooling system for your home based on its size and location. The small investment you make in performing this analysis will produce huge dividends in energy savings and reduced maintenance expenses.

Another important thing during this stage of planning is to have an Electrical Technician design an electrical plan for your home. This electrical plan will insure that you have the proper amount of outlets through the home and it will insure they have the proper voltage to ensure that you never overload a circuit or exert unnecessary pressure on any part of your electrical system. These (2) steps by themselves will produce a home that will save you hundreds if not thousands of dollars a year on your electrical bill and produce a more enjoyable living experience for you and the other occupants of your Dream Home.

The next energy saving feature to consider is the insulation system you will use. Recently there have been several foam based products that have grown increasingly popular due to their ability to create an air tight building envelope. This is great for those climates that have extremely fiercely winters and moderate summers but for humid climates like Houston, Texas where I live, these products can create HUGE problems because of mold issues! If you live in the Midwest or Upper East coast then these foam products will work great and by themselves they will cut your heating & cooling costs in half!

However if you are like me and live in the Southwest, I suggest using a battled fiberglass solution in most cases with facing on the side that faces the sheetrock and a blown-in insulation for your attic applications. I usually suggest that you use a razor and cut lines in the facing before covering them up with sheetrock to allow the walls to breathe. This one minor step prevents mold growth as it allows air to freely move through the walls prohibiting moisture.

My next recommendation has become commonplace in the homes of the finer custom homebuilders and in many cases is offered as an upgrade by the tract homebuilders and that is radiant barriers! Quite simply, a radiant barrier is the foil like surface that is on the underside of the plywood-like material that you see in your attic that your roof is nailed to. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to prevent the heat from the sun from coming into the home via the roof.

Usually a radiant barrier blocks as much as 50% of the suns ultraviolet rays theseby reducing your attic temperature by as much as 30% or more in some applications. This feature is not very expensive and usually costs $ 30.00 – $ 35.00 per 4×8 sheet in comparison to the non radiant barrier sheets which generally cost $ 23.00 – $ 28.00 per 4×8 sheet. Again, this small investment will produce huge gains via the lower energy bills and increased comfort and quality of lifestyle it will afford you and your family.

This next energy saving feature is one of my favorite of all features and that is the tank-less water heater! Can you believe it, a water heater the size of a shoe box! These have got to be one of the coolest products on the market and besides the energy savings they provide, you will also like that they produce an endless flow of hot water! Tank-less water heaters are rapidly gaining steam (pun intended) in the custom home market despite being reasonably higher than your standard water heater, but it's a worthy investment to say the least!

Our last energy saving product is a Mana-Bloc © managed plumbing system. This plumbing system will save you money on your water bill as it will reduce the amount of water waste and it allows you to manage every single water feature in your home. So if you have a hot water leak in your half bath, you can cut off the hot water in that area without affecting the cold water or any other water feature in the home. In addition to that you do not have to worry about water leaking until you get the leak repaired which causes water damage and mold!

These managed systems really represent the future of home efficiency products with their ability to customize and manage every aspect of your water consumption and provide a better overall quality of lifestyle for the end user!

I can assure you that if you follow the steps outlined here and consistently considering the products and procedures outlined you will cut your energy costs by half (or more) in your Custom Dream Home! As energy prices continue to rise, this strategic energy planning and thinking regarding building a home will become a standard procedure for Owner Builders and home buyers alike.

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7 Best Marine Battery Chargers in 2018 – For Smart, Efficient Charging



UPDATED RANKING ►►https://www.fishfindly.com/best-marine-battery-chargers/
Disclaimer: These choices may be out of date. You need to go to fishfindly.com to see the most recent updates to the list.

Our complete review, including our selection for the year’s 7 Best Marine Battery Charger is exclusively available on FishFindly.

These 7 Best Marine Battery Charger Video Buying Guide Included Products Are:

#1. NOCO Genius Gen3 30 A 3-Bank Smart Battery Charger
#2. Schumacher SE-4022 Manual Wheeled Battery Charger and Tester
#3. ProMariner ProSport 20 Plus Gen 3 20Amp Charger
#4. MinnKota MK 210D On-Board Battery Charger
#5. Weego JS12 Jump Starter 1400 Peak 400 Cranking Amp Lithium Ion Pack
#6. NOCO Genius Gen M2 Waterproof Battery Charger
#7. Marinco Charge Pro Waterproof Battery Chargers

Nowadays, the marine battery charger market has hundreds of chargers that you can easily choose from with price tags ranging from $50-$1000 and some of them even come with their own power banks.

However, it is important to look for marine battery chargers that have been tested and certified by the American Boat and Yacht Council.

Most Recent Picks: https://www.fishfindly.com/best-marine-battery-chargers/

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Saving Power With an Efficient UPS

With environmental issues becoming more and more critical it is important to make sure that you have the right UPS system for your needs. Systems that are not properly fitted burn more energy and are much more likely to fail, which is more important to avoid than ever.

There are many ways in which this can be avoided, modular systems are just one way in which you can reduce emissions and help you to have flexible power and space plans. These modules can be made specifically to the right size by having removable 'hot-swappable' modules. This allows power to be added or taken away. Energy consideration is increasingly important in today's businesses. These modular systems leave a much smaller footprint then the larger systems. Alongside this, they also only need a quarter of the floor space.

An UPS power solution is also a good way of saving your company money. With more single points of failure introduced into the system it means that a disruption can be eliminated with at one point and takes away the chance of big disruptions to the system. The additional cost of a DPA system will be regained by the eradication of single point errors and guarantees system uptime.

UPS works closer to the load capacity then the more traditional system. A traditional system works to just 50% loading while a modular system works at 70% or higher. This reduces energy and cooling requirements. The amount of saving you make on running costs, emissions and floor space will definitely be worth the slightly higher initial cost of the modular system. The cost of parts and replacement for the modular system is lower and the likelihood of failure is also decreed. When compared with normal parallel protection systems, decentralized modules lessen electricity expenses, heat loss and CO2 emissions, while introducing the industry's smallest footprint.

Data centers are now using a mix of old and new computers which is causing a shift towards unity. The introduction of blade servers means that the power factor may become leading. This can cause problems for UPS installations. As the load type changes from lagging to leading the UPS's quickly get to their limits. As replacing these systems can be cost it is better to use a transformer less UPS with an adaptive inverter switch. This will improve the operation of the system and will give improved efficiency.

There are many different ways to save money with a modular UPS system, but if you do not feel like this is the right option for you then there is also the option of UPS hire . This enables you to briefly use a UPS system if you need to do so for a short period of time.

UPS are a leading provider of power protection products and UPS power solutions from battery banks to power conditioning equipment.

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Cordless battery charging station



In an attempt to increase efficiency I connected all my battery chargers together and strapped them to a board. Much easier and neater.

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How to build a Capacitive Battery Charger (Part 1)



How to build a Capacitive Battery Charger. For parts, or to purchase complete units, please call 414-852-7526
See our other videos for Part 2 of 2.
Build it Yourself Recommended Parts List!
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FULL BUILD VIDEO!

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Universal Battery Charger | 1AU | Tesla Chargers



www.TeslaChargers.com

This is the first truly UNIVERSAL BATTERY CHARGER ever made available to the public.

The 1AU will charge and restore all rechargeable batteries from 1.2 volts up to 24 volts. Besides this, its simple battery connection technology works with almost all battery styles, eliminating the need for special adapters.

Specifically designed for charging Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries, the 1AU charger will also charge small lead-acid gel cells, rechargeable alkaline, and other battery types.

Finally, you can keep all of the batteries you have running at peak performance with the 1AU. If you only buy one battery charger in your whole life, this is the one to get! Don’t throw those old batteries away until you have given them a second chance with the 1AU.

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How To DIY Solar Battery Charger



http://www.EnergyBrainiac.com – How To DIY Solar Battery Charger
The DIY Solar Charger | Popular Science
Jul 6, 2007 … The DIY Solar Charger. Keep your gadgets powered even when the grid … and build frames to hold the DC charger controller and the battery. …DIY: Solar Powered Battery Rechargers
In their latest catalog, several solar battery chargers are offered but one is particularly useful. The small Multi-volt Output Solar Panel (Cat. …Get Prepared Stuff – DIY Solar AA Battery Charger”
Most of the AA solar battery chargers available wouldn’t charge two AA 2000 mAh batteries in 4 days let alone 1 day of 4-5 hours of sun.Solar Battery Charging – Solar
Jul 30, 2007 … One of the simplest DIY solar projects is to make your own solar battery charger using a small Photovoltaic (PV) solar panel. …DIY Solar Battery Charger – Solar Energy How-to-Guide Directoy
DIY Solar Battery charger. Build your own solar battery charger for all of your electronic gadgets.Design Solar-Powered Computing Device – Hacked Gadgets – DIY Tech Blog
DIY projects describing how to build electronic projects. … Solar Battery Chargers – Cheap Solar Battery Chargers and Battery Charger ..
How To DIY Solar Battery Charger

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Are Electric Radiators Efficient?

Radiator experts are frequently asked whether electric radiators are “efficient” and, more specifically, whether storage heaters are more “efficient” than other types of electric heating.

When it comes to radiators, the word “efficiency” can be interpreted in many ways. From our experience, when a customer asks “Which radiators are the most efficient?” they could mean:

  1. Which radiator gives out the most heat for its size?
  2. Which radiator is the cheapest to run?
  3. Which radiator uses the least fuel?
  4. Which radiator heats up the quickest?
  5. Which radiator is most environmentally friendly?

Electric radiators are generally regarded as being 100% efficient as almost 100% of the electricity consumed by the radiator is converted into heat and released into the room. (This differs from piped hot water central heating systems where some of the heat can be lost through the pipes on route to the radiators and the boiler.) Therefore it could be argued that all electric radiators are equal in efficiency as the energy put into the radiator will equal the amount of heat put out.

So the questions above cannot be answered by looking at efficiency; instead the key to choosing the best electric radiator is to decide which would be most effective in your specific situation.

This article aims to give clear information and facts to help you choose the electric heating product that best matches your unique lifestyle and heating needs. This will then enable you to minimise any wasted energy, which in turn will help reduce the amount of fuel you use, therefore reducing the cost of your electricity bills and your impact on the environment.

Whichever form of electric heating you opt for, we always suggest looking at the various energy providers’ tariffs to compare pricing as the cost of electricity can vary significantly; pricing does not only vary between suppliers but also between the wide varieties of tariffs offered by each supplier.

Below we have provided a summary of the electric heating options available on the market detailing their pros and cons to help you choose which option is the best for your home.

Electric heaters or electric radiators generally come in two distinct styles:

  • Storage heaters; or
  • On demand heaters, namely;

    1. Radiant heating panels;
    2. Convectors; and
    3. Liquid-filled electric radiators.

Storage heaters

These make use of the cheaper electricity that is available at night on an economy tariff. Electricity is used to heat up ceramic bricks within the heater overnight which then “store” the heat and slowly release it gradually over the course of the following day. Storage heaters were historically seen as the only real alternative to gas central heating and are still a common sight in homes across the UK.

Example: Using a storage heater in a room that requires 1kW of heat

  • Require a storage heater that consumes around 3.2 kiloWatts or kW per hour.
  • Economy 7 tariff = 7 hours electricity at a cheaper rate during the night.
  • Storage heater is set to “charge” for these 7 hours, consuming 3.2kW per hour for 7 hours.
  • Consumes a total of 22.4kW per night.
  • Releases the 22.4kW of heat consumed over a 24 hour period = heat output of 0.933kW of heat per hour.

This means that storage heaters are efficient, insomuch as they give out all the energy that they consume, however they do consume a lot of energy. Interestingly, storage heaters were originally developed during the strikes of the late seventies and there is an argument that the government encouraged their use at this time as they were keen to keep the power stations running to make the country dependent on the coal industry.

Storage heaters can offer a practical solution for many homeowners; for example, as the heat is released throughout the day, storage heaters are more suitable for people who are retired or at home throughout the day. Alternatively, if you work full time and do not require heating during the day, storage heaters may not be the best option as heat will be emitted even when you are not there, resulting in unnecessary energy wastage.

The nature of storage heaters does make them harder to control than “on demand” heating products. For instance, consider the following scenarios:

  • You spontaneously decide to go out for the day, but you have already paid for that day’s heating;
  • You go on holiday and turn the heating off, but there will be no “charge” in the heater when you return, meaning time sat in a cold house; and
  • You may want to turn the heating off in summer, but an unexpected cold snap might mean you need to do an urgent “boost” on the heaters during the day, which would be charged at a high peak rate.
  • This lack of controllability makes homeowners reluctant to deviate from the pre-determined charging hours and standard usage.

Also as storage heaters age, their internal insulation can break down; resulting in heat being expended too fast and so supplementary heating may be required for later on in the day; this supplementary heating would be charged at the peak rate per hour, rather than the economy rate. Bear in mind that the peak rates on Economy tariffs are usually significantly higher than at any time on non-Economy tariffs and these rates apply to all appliances used during peak hours, not just radiators.

Storage heaters are often deemed unattractive and the nature of their design makes them quite bulky protruding significantly into a room.

On demand heaters

The following 3 forms of electric heating consume electricity “on demand” unlike storage heaters. “On demand” heating products allow you to only turn the heater on when you need heat, and turn it off when you don’t need heat. This makes them the better option for avoiding wasted energy as you only have the radiators on as and when needed and there is no need to second guess what the weather will be doing 24 hours in advance, which is particularly useful with the unpredictable British climate. On demand heaters are normally used with regular, non-Economy electricity tariffs, which do not use cheaper night-time rates.

Example: Using an on-demand heater in a room that requires 1kW of heat

  • Require an on-demand heater that consumes 1 kW per hour.
  • Standard electricity tariff = same rate at all times of the day.
  • For someone who works 9am to 5pm; On-demand heater timer is set to come on at 7am till 8am and 6pm till 11pm, so consumes 1kW per hour for 6 hours.
  • Consumes a total of 6kW per day giving a heat output of 1kW of heat per hour.

This example shows a significant reduction in the amount of energy used by someone who works standard hours; when comparing a storage heater with an on demand heater, despite the electricity being charged at a higher rate than on the rates for the Economy 7 tariff, this could still be the most cost effective option in this type of scenario.

On demand heating products, as detailed below, usually provide a better solution than storage heaters to the question “which radiator is most efficient?”

  1. Radiant heating panels are either hollow, or, more commonly, are a sealed unit. An electric element is concealed within the radiator, which heats up and radiates heat out evenly from the front of the radiator. Radiant heat is absorbed by the furniture, fabrics and carpet in a room, so the warmth is retained for longer. This type of radiator is particularly good for people with dust allergies as their flat panel makes them easy to clean and they don’t “convect” heat or promote air circulation to heat a space; these factors help to reduce the amount of dust being circulated around a room.
  2. Convectors, or heaters that make use of convection, warm a room by following the principle that hot air rises. Electric convectors usually consist of a hollow case; open at the top and bottom with a visible coil heating element. (Quite often, when these radiators are switched on and you look inside them, you can see the heating element glowing red inside the radiator.) Convection heating works by creating a cycle of air circulation; cool air comes from underneath the radiator, it is drawn up from the bottom of the radiator and then warms up and rises or “convects” as it passes the heating element, emitting warm air from the top of the radiator. This warm air rises to the ceiling, cools and falls back to the floor then repeats the process. Electric fan heaters also work on the same principle; the only key difference being that the fan forces air across the electric element speeding up the movement of warm air. This means that fan heaters will blast warm air into a room very quickly, but as soon as they are turned off, the room will cool almost immediately. Radiators that work on convection can sometimes be the cause of black marks seen on walls above radiators; these are caused by the residue of dust being drawn up into the radiator and burnt onto the open element.
  3. Liquid-filled electric radiators operate in similar way to radiant panel type heaters; they are sealed units with an internal heating element that releases this heat via the outer case, however the elements are submerged in a liquid such as oil, water with corrosion inhibitor or heat transfer agent/gel rather than being dry. Depending on the design of the radiator, the heat generated can be entirely radiant or a combination of radiant and convected heat. Historically, oil was used to fill electric radiators. However water is now increasingly common as this offers a cleaner option; for instance, The National Trust uses water-filled electric radiators as they do not want to risk using oil which could cause damage to a historical property or its contents.

So in summary, a radiator is just a vessel designed to release energy in the form of heat and the amount of heat that a radiator releases will depend on the amount of energy put into it; this is particularly true of electric radiators, where they will perform at approximately 100% efficiency.

  • Storage heaters use a large amount of cheap electricity, but lack controllability resulting in energy wastage. “On demand” heaters use less electricity and offer greater flexibility, but this electricity is not available on an Economy tariff.
  • Convected heat immediately warms the air in a room, but the heat dissipates almost immediately as the heat source is turned off. Radiated heat takes longer to warm a room as it heats objects not just the air, but this means that the room stays warm for much longer.

In practice, there are many aspects that will determine the best radiator(s) for your project including your lifestyle e.g. working hours, size restrictions, interior décor, budget and availability; your choice will be governed by which factors take priority. The research proves that when it comes to heating, there is no magic “one-size fits all” solution.

For more advice on choosing the most effective electric heating product, speak to an electric radiator specialist.

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